HSEM 3414H: Setting Prices on the Priceless -- The Moral Arithmetic of Pricing Prescription Drugs

2 CreditsHonors

In the 1930s, antiwar activists used the epithet “merchants of death” to denounce armaments manufacturers and their financiers. In a curious twist, today it is the turn of what might be called “merchants of life” – for-profit drug companies which have saved hundreds of millions of lives – to be a pariah industry. The rage against drug companies is bipartisan. In the 2016 Presidential race, Trump said that drug companies were getting away with murder and Clinton charged that they were making a fortune out of people’s misfortune. The main complaint against drug companies is, of course, that they are price gougers. They abuse their government-enforced monopolies to charge extortionate prices that deny some Americans access to treatment for life-threatening illnesses, bankrupt middle-class Americans, and place intolerable strains on state budgets. This seminar will use a cure for hepatitis C (Sovaldi) to evaluate the claim that drug companies charge exorbitant prices and (optimistically?) to try to answer the question of what is a just price for a life-saving drug. Or, in other words, how should we price priceless goods? Note: In fall 2022, this course will be offered as an A-Term 2 credit course.

View on University Catalog

All Instructors

A- Average (3.812)Most Common: A (51%)

This total also includes data from semesters with unknown instructors.

39 students
FDCBA
  • 4.38

    /5

    Recommend
  • 4.63

    /5

    Effort
  • 4.63

    /5

    Understanding
  • 4.25

    /5

    Interesting
  • 4.38

    /5

    Activities


      Contribute on our Github

      Gopher Grades is maintained by Social Coding with data from Summer 2017 to Fall 2023 provided by the Office of Institutional Data and Research

      Privacy Policy